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Associated Press
A woman shops Monday at the CambridgeSide Galleria mall in Cambridge, Mass. Early figures point to a ho-hum season for retailers despite last-ditch efforts to lure shoppers.

Spending down on final holiday weekend

– Christmas shoppers thronged malls and pounced on discounts but apparently spent less this year, their spirits dampened by concerns about the economy and the aftermath of shootings and storms.

Talk about more than just the usual job worries to cloud the mood: Confidence among U.S. consumers dipped to its lowest point in December since July amid rising economic worries, according to a monthly index released Friday.

Marshal Cohen, chief research analyst at NPD Inc., a market research firm with a network of analysts at shopping centers nationwide, estimates customer traffic over the weekend was in line with the same time a year ago, but that shoppers seem to be spending less.

“There was this absence of joy for the holiday,” Cohen said. “There was no Christmas spirit. There have been just too many distractions.”

Shoppers are increasingly worried about the fiscal cliff deadline – the possibility that a stalemate between Congress and the White House over the U.S. budget could trigger a series of tax increases and spending cuts starting Jan. 1.

The recent Newtown, Conn., school shooting also dampened shoppers’ spirits atop the fall’s retail woes after Superstorm Sandy’s passage up the East Coast.

The Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, which account for 24 percent of retail sales nationwide, were tripped up by Sandy when the enormous storm clobbered the region in late October, disrupting businesses and households for weeks.

All that spelled glum news for retailers, which can make up to 40 percent of annual sales during November and December.

They were counting on the last weekend before Christmas to make up for lost dollars earlier in the season.

The Saturday before Christmas was expected to be the second biggest sales day behind the Friday after Thanksgiving.

But the deals at the mall failed to impress Wendy McCloskey, 35, of Lebanon, who started her holiday shopping Sunday at the Castleton Square Mall in Indianapolis.

A snow storm that blustered through the Midwest last week delayed her shopping plans, and a busy schedule with her children also got in the way.

“I was so surprised. I figured they’d have better deals,” she said.

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