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Associated Press
People gesture toward the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, on Friday. Thousands believed they were marking the end of a Mayan cycle.

Amid fanfare, Mayan cycle ends – maybe

– Dec. 21 started out as the prophetic day some had believed would usher in the fiery end of the world. By Friday afternoon, it had become more comic than cosmic, the punch line of countless Facebook posts and at least several dozen T-shirts.

At the ruins of the ancient Mayan city of Chichen Itza, thousands chanted, danced and otherwise frolicked around ceremonial fires and pyramids to mark the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar.

The doomsayers who had predicted apocalypse were nowhere to be seen. Instead, people showed up in T-shirts reading “The End of the World: I Was There.”

Vendors eager to sell their ceramic handicrafts and wooden masks called out to passing visitors, “Buy something before the world ends.”

And on Twitter, #EndoftheWorld had become one of the day’s most popular hash tags.

For the masses in the ruins, Dec. 21 sparked celebration of what they saw as the birth of a new and better age. It was also inspiration for massive clouds of patchouli and marijuana smoke and a chorus of conch calls at the break of dawn.

The boisterous gathering Friday included Buddhists, pagan nature worshippers, druids and followers of Aztec and Maya religious traditions. Some kneeled in attitudes of prayer, some seated with arms outstretched in positions of meditation, all facing El Castillo, the massive main pyramid.

Ceremonies were held at different sides of the pyramid, including one led by a music group that belted out American blues and reggae-inspired chants. Others involved yelping and shouting, and drumming and dance, such as one ceremony led by spiritual master Ollin Yolotzin.

“The world was never going to end, this was an invention of the mass media,” said Yolotzin, who leads the Aztec ritual dance group Cuautli-balam. “It is going to be a good era. … We are going to be better.”

Ivan Gutierrez, a 37-year-old artist who lives in the nearby village, stood before the pyramid and blew a low, blast on a conch horn.

“It has already arrived, we are already in it,” he said of the new era. “We are in a frequency of love, we are in a new vibration.”

But it was unclear how long the love would last: A security guard quickly came over and asked him to stop blowing his conch shell, enforcing the ruin site’s ban on holding ceremonies without previous permits.

Despite all the pomp, no one is certain the period known as the Mayas’ 13th Baktun officially ended Friday. Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History even suggested historical calculations to synchronize the Mayan and Western calendars might be off a few days. It said the Mayan Long Count calendar cycle might not really end until Sunday.

End-of-the-world paranoia, however, has spread globally despite the insistence of archeologists and the Maya themselves that the date meant no such thing.

Dozens of schools in Michigan canceled classes this week amid rumors of violence tied to the date. In France, people expecting doomsday were looking expectantly to a mountain in the Pyrenees where they believe a hidden spaceship was waiting to spirit them away.

Gabriel Romero, a spiritualist from Los Angeles who uses crystal skulls in his ceremonies, had no such illusions as he greeted the dawn at Chichen Itza.

“We’ll still have to pay taxes next year,” he said.

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