You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

U.S.

  • Yurok Tribe to release condors in California
    Yurok tribal tradition holds the California condor as sacred, with ancient stories saying the giant birds fly closest to the sun and are the best messengers to carry prayers.
  • Tornado shelters face dilemma with pet lovers
    Jerry Starr thought he was taking the safe approach when a twister was reported heading toward his suburban neighborhood outside Oklahoma City last May.
  • No leniency for teen in autistic boy’s abuse
    Before she was sentenced Thursday to a maximum of six years in a state juvenile detention center, the 15-year-old assailant of an autistic boy in southern Maryland pleaded for leniency.
Advertisement

Drought exposes Great Lakes wrecks

GRAND HAVEN, Mich. – The remains of a wooden steamer built 125 years ago recently were uncovered in West Michigan because of lower Great Lakes water levels.

The Muskegon Chronicle reports (http://bit.ly/XS5bCY) sections of the 290-foot steamer Aurora, which burned in 1932, and parts of at least four other shipwreck hulks were exposed by the receding waterline at Grand Haven near the edges of Harbor Island.

The Aurora is in the Grand River, which flows into Lake Michigan nearby.

Michigan Shipwreck Research Associates members and officials with the Tri-Cities Historical Museum in Grand Haven have surveyed the area. Valerie Van Heest, director of MSRA and a maritime historian, says this offers a rare chance to see wrecks without having to scuba dive.

The Great Lakes are shrinking because of drought and rising temperatures.

Advertisement