You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Features

  • Thrills in store in Texas hills
    Looking to get more out of your vacation dollar? Before booking, take a cue from the experts.Each year, Travelzoo predicts where American travelers are likely to find the best bang for their buck.
  • Coffee table books seek space on wish lists
    NEW YORK – As self-purchases, coffee table books may seem like pricey indulgences, but as gifts, they’re an easy way to please a connoisseur, hobbyist or wannabe.
  • Clinic of last resort struggling
    In the green-painted basement of a former parish school, old church pews serve as waiting-room seating and long fluorescent tube lights hum quietly overhead. Cast-off office cubicle dividers separate medical exam rooms.
Advertisement
At a glance
Apple products were four of the top five items children ages 6 to 12 listed when asked about what they were interested in buying in the next six months.
The top 10
•iPad…48 percent
•Nintendo Wii U…39 percent
•iPod Touch…36 percent
•iPad Mini…36 percent
•iPhone…33 percent
•Computer…31 percent
•Kinect for Xbox 360…31 percent
•Tablet other than iPad…29 percent
•Nintendo 3DS/3DS XL…29 percent
•Nintendo DS/DS Lite/DSi/DSi XL…28 percent
Source: Nielsen
File
About half of kids ages 6 to 12 expressed interest in an iPad during a recent study.

Should Santa bring iPad?

Parents weighing if device is right for their children

It’s official: The holiday season is upon us. As usual, there’s a hot gift. But I don’t ever recall witnessing that gift divide so many households.

Is this the year to get the kid an iPad?

A recent Nielsen survey of kids ages 6 to 12 found that “approximately half the children surveyed expressed interest in the full-sized iPad (up from 44 percent last year), and 36 percent in the new iPad Mini.”

Whether Santa or his parental minions will deliver an iPad is another matter.

That debate has many variables: a child’s age, his aptitude with computers and trustworthiness; a parent’s disposable income and her attitude toward electronic media.

The American Academy of Pediatrics warns that “excessive media use can lead to attention problems, school difficulties, sleep and eating disorders, and obesity. In addition, the Internet and cell phones can provide platforms for illicit and risky behaviors.”

The other side of this modern coin is anxiety over lack of screen time. “I’m worried she’ll be the only one in her class who doesn’t know how to use a computer,” a friend of mine recently confided.

She and her husband had endured well without any gadgets, but for their daughter, they are contemplating making the purchase so she won’t fall behind her peers.

Their daughter is 3.

Which brings up the age question.

“In a supervised environment, children as young as four or five are able to engage in learning activities using smartphones and tablets of all kinds. In an unsupervised environment, I wouldn’t recommend a smartphone or tablet purchase for a child until at least between the ages of 11 and 13,” one expert told PBS.org.

For many families, that guidance is unrealistic.

The point of the tablets, after all, may be that the parents can check out for a few minutes while their child is entertained by an at least marginally educational app.

Advertisement