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Suitors lining up for Twinkies

Hostess prepares for big bake sale

– The future of Twinkies is virtually assured.

Hostess Brands Inc. got final approval for its wind-down plans in bankruptcy court Thursday, setting the stage for its iconic snack cakes to find a second life with new owners – even as 18,000 jobs will be wiped out.

The company said in court that it’s in talks with 110 potential buyers for its brands, which include CupCakes, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos. The suitors include at least five national retailers such as supermarkets, a financial adviser for Hostess said. The process has been “so fast and furious” Hostess wasn’t able to make its planned calls to potential buyers, said Joshua Scherer of Perella Weinberg Partners.

“Not only are these buyers serious, but they are expecting to spend substantial sums,” he said, noting that six of them had hired investment banks to help in the process.

The update on the sale process came as Hostess received approval to give its top executives bonuses totaling up to $1.8 million for meeting certain budget goals during the liquidation. The company says the incentive pay is needed to retain the 19 corporate officers and “high-level managers” for the wind-down process, which could take about a year.

Two of those executives would be eligible for additional rewards depending on how efficiently they carry out the liquidation. The compensation would be on top of their regular pay.

The bonuses do not include pay for CEO Gregory Rayburn, who was brought on as a restructuring expert this year. Rayburn is being paid $125,000 a month.

Hostess was given interim approval for its wind-down last week, which gave the company the legal protection to immediately fire 15,000 union workers. The company said the terminations were necessary to free up workers to apply for unemployment benefits.

About 3,200 employees are being retained to help in winding down operations, including 237 employees at the corporate level.

Hostess has indicated it needs to move quickly to capitalize on the outpouring of nostalgia sparked by its liquidation.

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