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Health

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Additional death stems from injection
INDIANAPOLIS – A second person has died from fungal meningitis after receiving an injection in Indiana that has been linked to tainted steroids used for back pain, state and federal health officials said Saturday.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the second death on its website Saturday and said three additional cases of the rare disease had been reported in Indiana, raising the state’s total to 27. The outbreak has affected 13 states and caused 15 deaths nationwide.
State Department of Health spokesman Ken Severson confirmed the CDC report but said he had no additional information about the death. He said he was trying to determine whether the second death was an Indiana resident.
Family members of an 89-year-old southern Michigan woman who received two shots at a northern Indiana clinic said last week that they believed she was Indiana’s first death.
Associated Press
The CDC said Thursday tests have shown Exserohilum fungus in 10 people sickened in the current fungal meningitis outbreak.

Outbreak spurs call for tighter laws

– The deadly meningitis outbreak linked to contaminated pain injections has prompted calls for tighter federal regulation of compounding pharmacies, which have periodically been blamed for crippling and sometimes fatal injuries. But this isn’t the first time Congress has pushed for more authority over the industry.

Such efforts stretch back to the 1990s, and after vigorous pushback by compounding pharmacists, they have left a patchwork of incomplete, overlapping laws, contradictory court rulings and overall uncertainty about how much power the Food and Drug Administration has to regulate compounders.

And with a gridlocked Congress at its most unproductive in decades, experts don’t expect to see new laws passed anytime soon.

Several members of Congress this week promised to introduce legislation giving the FDA greater authority to oversee the specialty pharmacies, which custom-mix drugs for patients for maladies as varied as menopause symptoms and cancer. The compounding industry in the U.S. has grown into a $3 billion business with 7,500 pharmacies, according to its trade group.

“It’s incredibly complicated to explain what our authority is and is not, and the nuances of that,” Deborah Autor, FDA’s deputy regulatory commissioner, said Thursday. She suggested the FDA would support new laws to oversee the industry.

“The world has changed a lot since the days of mortar and pestle, and this is the time for pharmacists, for lawmakers, for regulators and for doctors to sit down to grapple with this new model of pharmacy compounding,” Autor said.

Compounding pharmacies are critical for patients who need solutions, creams and other medicines customized for, say, smaller dosages or to remove ingredients that cause allergies. Unlike drugs that are manufactured for mass-market distribution, these products are not subject to premarket review by the FDA.

All pharmacies, including compounding pharmacies, have long been regulated by state pharmacy boards, many of which date back to the 19th century. At that time, nearly all drugs dispensed in the U.S. were individually compounded by pharmacists. The law that created the FDA in 1938 gave the agency strict authority over drug manufacturers, which quickly eclipsed pharmacists as the main producers of medicines.

For decades, the state-federal divide persisted, with states overseeing compounding pharmacies and the FDA policing drug manufacturers.

But in the 1990s, FDA regulators began to more closely scrutinize compounding pharmacies, as their number multiplied and some grew into big businesses. Instead of making individualized products based on a physician’s prescription, companies began mass-producing products and promoting them broadly.

“When you get into that situation, pharmacy compounding can be a disguise for unregulated manufacturing,” said Michael Labson, a food and drug attorney in Washington.

FDA officials have repeatedly stressed the challenges the agency faces policing compounding operations. In fact, some former agency officials say that the FDA is hesitant to act after years of legal battles with lawyers and lobbyists for the industry.

The International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists has spent more than $1 million lobbying Congress in the past decade and has a track record of defeating measures opposed by the industry.

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