You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Science & Tech

  • 3-D printer heading into orbit
    The 3-D printing boom is about to invade space. NASA is sending a 3-D printer to the international space station in hopes that astronauts will be able to one day fix their spacecraft by cranking out spare parts on the spot.
  • Massive black hole is found in tiny galaxy
    A supermassive black hole has been spotted in the tiniest galaxy yet – an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy – which suggests that black holes could be in places we haven’t even thought to look yet.
  • Scientists’ colossal squid exam a kraken good show
     WELLINGTON, New Zealand – It was a calm morning in Antarctica’s remote Ross Sea, during the season when the sun never sets, when Capt.
Advertisement

2 in US win Nobel in chemistry

– Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for studies of how the cells in our bodies pick up signals as diverse as hormones, smells, flavors and light – work that is key to developing better medicines.

Those signals are received by specialized proteins on cell surfaces.

Dr. Robert Lefkowitz and Dr. Brian Kobilka made groundbreaking discoveries about the inner workings of those proteins, mainly in the 1980s, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said.

The proteins are called G-protein-coupled receptors. Many of today’s drugs – maybe about half – act on these receptors, including beta blockers and antihistamines. Experts say the prize-winning work and subsequent research is helping scientists as they try to improve current drugs and develop new ones.

The receptors pick up signals outside a cell and relay a message to the interior.

“They work as a gateway to the cell,” Lefkowitz told a news conference in Stockholm by phone. “As a result, they are crucial ... to regulate almost every known physiological process with humans.”

Lefkowitz, 69, is an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and professor at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C.

Kobilka, 57, worked for Lefkowitz at Duke before transferring to Stanford University School of Medicine in California, where he is now a professor.

The academy said it was long a mystery how cells interact with their environment and adapt to new situations, such as when they react to adrenaline by increasing blood pressure and making the heart beat faster.

The two prize winners “have been at the forefront of this entire scientific journey,” the Nobel committee said.

Advertisement