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Health

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Associated Press
Debra Lambrecht is director of the private Greenwood School in Mill Valley, Calif. An AP analysis found a 10 percent rise last year in the number of private school students in California who were not vaccinated.

Private school vaccine opt-outs up

Whooping cough scare unable to reverse pattern

– Parents who send their children to private schools in California are much more likely to opt out of immunizations than their public school counterparts, an Associated Press analysis has found, and not even the recent re-emergence of whooping cough has halted the downward trajectory of vaccinations among these students.

The state surveys all schools with at least 10 kindergartners to determine how many have all the recommended immunizations.

The Associated Press analyzed that data and found the percentage of children in private schools who forego some or all vaccinations is more than two times greater than in public schools.

More troubling to public health officials is that the number of children entering private schools without all of their shots jumped by 10 percent last year, while the opt-out rate held steady in public schools for the first time since 2004.

Public health officials believe that an immunization rate of at least 90 percent in all communities, including schools, is critical to minimizing the potential for a disease outbreak.

About 15 percent of the 1,650 private schools surveyed by the state failed to reach that threshold, compared with 5 percent of public schools.

There were 110 private schools statewide where more than half the kindergartners skipped some or all of their shots, according to AP’s analysis, with Highland Hall Waldorf School in Northridge – where 84 percent opted out – topping the list.

Parents cite a variety of reasons for not immunizing their children, among them: religious values, concerns the shots themselves could cause illness and a belief that allowing children to get sick helps them to build a stronger immune system.

Likewise, there’s no single explanation that accounts for why so many more parents who send their children to private schools apparently share a suspicion of immunizations.

Saad Omer, a professor of global health at Emory University in Atlanta who has studied vaccine refusal in private schools, surmised more private-school parents are wealthy and have the time to spread five shots over a series of years and stay home should their child get an illness such as chickenpox.

Neal Halsey, a professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the Johns Hopkins University, said parents who choose private schools are likely to be more skeptical of state requirements and recommendations.

Bibi Reber, whose children attend the Waldorf-inspired Greenwood School in Mill Valley, had her children vaccinated only for what she sees as the deadliest diseases. Greenwood has a 79 percent opt-out rate among its kindergartners.

“I don’t think dirt or getting sick makes you a weak person; your immune system needs to work with things,” said Reber, whose children attend the Greenwood School in the San Francisco Bay area town of Mill Valley. “We certainly don’t want to go back to having polio, but on the other hand, I don’t think we need to eradicate all the childhood diseases

Public health officials say that, regardless of why parents choose not to vaccinate their children, the result is the same: an increased risk of an outbreak of whooping cough or other communicable diseases.

“We’re very concerned that those schools are places where disease can spread quite rapidly through the school and into the community, should it get introduced,” said Dr. Robert Schechter, medical officer with the Immunization Branch of the California Department of Public Health.

That’s what prompted the legislature to approve a bill requiring parents to discuss vaccinations with a pediatricians or a school nurse before they can opt-out.

Gov. Jerry Brown has until the end of September to sign or veto it.

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