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British Open
At Royal Lytham
& St. Annes
Lytham St. Annes, England
Yards: 7,086 Par: 70
First round
When: 5 a.m. today
TV: ESPN
Second round
When: 7 a.m. Friday
TV: ESPN
Third round
When: 7 a.m. Saturday
TV: ESPN
Final round
When: 6 a.m. Sunday
TV: ESPN
Associated Press
Tiger Woods plays a shot during a practice round Wednesday at Royal Lytham & St. Annes golf club.

Royal Lytham is a ‘tee-shot golf course’

– It’s rare to see Tiger Woods hit iron off the tee on a par 5, except in links golf, and especially at Royal Lytham & St. Annes.

With a stiff breeze in his face on the 598-yard 11th hole, he most likely could not reach the green in two. The idea was to be able to get there in three shots, which meant staying out of trouble off the tee. His low bullet of a shot stopped 10 paces short of feeding into a pot bunker. If the shot had gone much longer, Woods might have had to blast out sideways and still had about 300 yards left to the green.

The key to this British Open is to get off to a good start – not just today, but on every hole.

“At most PGA Tour events, the shorter the shot, the more important it is,” Geoff Ogilvy said. “This one, the longer the shot the more important it is.”

The adage of “drive for show, putt for dough” doesn’t necessarily apply at Lytham.

“The easy part is around the greens,” Ben Curtis said. “The hard part is off the tee.”

Royal Lytham is the shortest course on the Open rotation over the last decade, and it’s on the smallest piece of property, tucked a mile or so away from the Irish Sea and surrounded by homes and a railway.

The challenge comes from 206 bunkers and thick grass from a wet spring.

The powerful hitters can hit over the bunkers, as long as they avoid the next set of traps. But it’s not so simple to think that players can hit well short of the bunkers for a longer shot into the green, because they might not be able to reach the green.

“It’s a tee-shot golf course,” Graeme McDowell said. “The second shots are not particularly taxing. There’s not a lot of trouble around the greens. There are bunkers, but not a lot of heavy rough. You’ve got to position yourself off the tee to give yourself a chance. You’ve got to keep it out of the bunkers. It’s a good test. I don’t think you can hide on this golf course.”

The defense of any links course is pot bunkers and the wind. Woods won his first claret jug at St. Andrews in 2000 by going the entire week without hitting into a bunker. But there’s something different about Royal Lytham that can make it look particularly daunting. Accuracy is important. So is the right distance.

Along with the hazards are the elements, which tend to play a big role in links golf. This week, the forecast has been a mystery.

The Royal & Ancient puts out an update three times a day on the weather, and the only thing that can be trusted is the small print at the bottom: “This forecast may be amended at any time.”

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